The Eiffel Tower (1)

Lucien Hervé was one of the great photographers of the 20th century and dedicated in excess of 50 years to capturing images of the most clichéd monument in Paris: the Eiffel Tower. Born in Hungary in 1910 as Laszlo Elkan, he trained as an artist before moving to Paris in 1929 to work in the fashion industry though it wasn’t until 1938 that his mission with the Eiffel Tower began: sometimes he captured the vast structure as part of an ongoing project and sometimes simply caught it on the horizon. The breadth of Hervé’s work is fascinating and includes studies that are close up, from afar, under and within the tower, part-sections of architecture, shadows and reflections.

My own interest began as I noticed how often the Eiffel Tower crept, both deliberately and accidentally, into photographs around central Paris, La Defence and further afield. With a height of 300 meters this cast and wrought iron feat of engineering dominates the Parisian skyline though at other times, is just a faraway silhouette , its sheer magnitude fueling inspiration to explore this controversial tourist attraction; the beginning of an experimental journey...