I was happy to stumble across a basket of loquats (nèfle du Japon in French) in one of my local stores today. Oval in shape and resembling a miniature, shiny apricot, the fruit has large (inedible) seeds and a difficult flavour to describe; a prominent sweetness tempered by a juicy tang. Depending on variety, the flesh ranges from cream coloured to apricot and it is a delicious fruit to eat au-natural but its high pectin content makes it a good choice for making jams, jellies, but also delicious in chutney’s, sweet and savoury salsas and salads plus a tasty alternative to serve alongside a cheeseboard; interesting flavour pairings include firm, creamy bananas, mango, orange, strawberries, soft green salad leaves, chicken and duck. A soft fruit that easily damages so handle with care, storing in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.


Originating from China where it was cultivated for over 1000 years, before gradually spreading through East Asia, and India, reaching Europe in the 18th century. Today loquats are grown in small quantities around the Mediterranean, Australia and The Americas so not a common sight, so grab a bagful whenever you can.

The benefits of high pectin isn’t restricted to cooking, it is a form of gentle, water-soluble dietary fiber that keeps the digestive tract in tip-top condition. Additionally, this fruit is low-calorie and packed with Vitamins A, C and B-complex plus a plethora of minerals, making it a good choice, contributing to the general good health of cells, skin and hair. Keep a handful in the fridge to snack on, warding off the urge for chocolate; yes, I’m serious…